January 27–28, 2016
Esri Headquarters,
Redlands, California

Agenda

Tuesday, January 26, 2016
Time Activity Speaker Location
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Preconference Workshops
Various Esri Training Center
5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Geodesign Synthesis Dynamics

Geodesign is systems thinking and it is dynamic. A design is a relational synthesis in space and time of sets of system Changes. There are many ways to change a system and the sequence matters. Designs should be rapidly created, rapidly assessed and iteratively improved, knowing that any change has Impacts across all the systems and their Evaluation models. There are Change-versions based on design revisions and/or time-stages, and Change-alternatives based on diverse Decision models, alternative scenarios, sensitivity assessments, etc. There can be many in any Geodesign study. These must be compared, and (usually) one must be selected for action. Therefore, a primary aim of Geodesign is to rapidly move from almost infinite possible combinations of policies and projects towards technically, financially and politically feasible Decisions. The Geodesign endgame must support informed negotiation. These issues will be demonstrated via several 2015 case studies.

Co-presenters and cases to include:
Hrishi Ballal-Mulranny, County Mayo, Ireland
Tim Nyerges-King County, Washington, USA
Prashant Hedao-Hampi, Karnataka State, India
Barty Warren-Southern Cache Valley, Utah, USA

Carl Steinitz

Building Q,
Auditorium
Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Time Activity Speaker Location
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast   Atrium
8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Tom Fisher, College of Design University of Minnesota and Jack Dangermond, Esri Auditorium
9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Keynote Speaker: Geodesign as a Framework for Regional and Municipal Green Infrastructure Planning

In this talk, I will give an account of a major planning reform in the region of Valencia, Spain, based on a Geodesign framework that unifies strategic environmental analysis and landscape planning with urban and municipal planning. Now, when making and approving a plan, all public administrations must operate within this framework. It establishes Green Infrastructure as the unifying principle for the coordination at all the landscape scales, and as the framework for urban and spatial design. In order to implement the new framework, we developed a new urban and regional administrative structure and work organization that was adapted to meet the new needs. Finally, in order to share data and facilitate access to environmental and urban information, we designed new tools using Geographic Information Systems.

Arancha Munoz-Criado, City and Strategic Planner Auditorium
9:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Discussion on Q&A Arancha Munoz-Criado, Tom Fisher, Jack Dangermond Auditorium
10:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Networking Break   Atrium
10:45 a.m. – 11:05 a.m.
Featured Speaker: Geodesign Revives the Clean Water Act on Cape Code

Geodesign is working to keep a special place special on Cape Cod where the coastal waters of an environmentally fragile peninsula are threatened by nitrogen from the septic systems of an annual population that has quadrupled since 1950 and a seasonal population that triples that number every summer. Cape Cod's environment and its economy are intricately intertwined and the cost of doing the wrong thing is only outweighed by the cost of doing nothing. Recognizing the severity of the problem and accepting that a decade of effort by individual towns had not produced an effective response, the Governor resurrected a 40 year old provision of the Federal Clean Water Act and charged the Cape Cod Commission with completing a regional water quality management plan – in 12 months.

Geodesign principles combined with GIS-based decision support tools provided a new framework for problem-solving that is now designing the future of water quality on Cape Cod. The approach achieved consensus by making complex data easier to understand by using geospatial models focused on the jurisdiction of the problem, watersheds, instead of the jurisdiction of the politics.

The resulting plan produces more financial resources, initiates regulatory reform and qualifies a broad range of innovative technologies, saving residents billions of dollars and guiding the region in designing and implementing the most effective solutions to Cape Cod’s biggest challenge.

Paul Niedzwiecki, Cape Cod Commission Auditorium
11:10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Featured Speaker: Redesigning the Los Angeles Region for People and Water

With drought and El Niño as a back drop the Council for Watershed Health has developed a regional application for water infiltration, pollutant reduction and opportunity analysis. The Los Angeles region is rife with examples of “poverty pimping”, using measures of disadvantage to plan and design projects that are not wanted or understood by the community. Our design process instead is engaging community groups to leverage this analysis application to vet and develop projects that have simultaneous benefits for community quality of life metrics like access to open space, recreation, safe routes to school and active living as well as water quality and supply. Community groups with focuses other than water infrastructure are engaged to help them understand the potential for their projects to include water quality and quantity elements, as well as open the window for access to funding for those activities.

In a pivot from traditional Geodesign the application helps groups like Day One in El Monte to visually understand the results from complex modeling tasks and compare one location to another on metrics including increase in infiltration, opportunities to add to groundwater supplies, where pollutant concentrations in stormwater are highest, anthropogenic constraints like leaking underground storage tanks and many other cleanups. This information is based on hydrology modeling from the Bureau of Reclamation and the EPA models. Including multiple data sources made available via a WebApp Builder interface the application allows for a quick vetting of ideas while in meetings and during conversations on a mobile device.

John Tangenberg, Council for Watershed Health Auditorium
11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A Paul Niedzwiecki, John Tangenberg, Tom Fisher Auditorium
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Hosted Lunch   Esri Café
1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Lightning Talks   Auditorium
3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Networking Break & EXPO   Atrium
3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Featured Speakers: Geodesign, CityEngine, and the different scales of Urban Planning

Geodesign is systems thinking and it is dynamic. A design is a relational synthesis in space and time of sets of system Changes. There are many ways to change a system and the sequence matters. Designs should be rapidly created, rapidly assessed and iteratively improved, knowing that any change has Impacts across all the systems and their Evaluation models. There are Change-versions based on design revisions and/or time-stages, and Change-alternatives based on diverse Decision models, alternative scenarios, sensitivity assessments, etc. There can be many in any Geodesign study. These must be compared, and (usually) one must be selected for action. Therefore, a primary aim of Geodesign is to rapidly move from almost infinite possible combinations of policies and projects towards technically, financially and politically feasible Decisions. The Geodesign endgame must support informed negotiation. These issues will be demonstrated via several 2015 case studies.

Devin Lavigne, Houseal Lavigne Associates Auditorium
3:55 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Featured Speakers: Applied Techniques of Land Use Analysis for Regional Geodesign

Many designers, planners and decision-makers believe that they are endowed with a special gift that always makes their ideas fundamentally sound and the public should just implement what’s been created. If that were the case balancing the needs of conservation, development demands, and adjusting to the impacts of climate fluctuations would be less contentious.

To more soundly achieve this balance, the decision-making process must collaboratively include input from the sciences, practitioners, educators, and researchers. Technological innovation, model or system simulation, and visualization across multiple scales are the foundation of Geodesign and when combined with methods to integrate stakeholder input, it holds hope for a better way to produce designs and plans.

LUCISplus is a process of analyzing planning land-use scenarios and comparing results systemically that the authors of the “Advanced Land Use Analysis for Regional Geodesign” book, published by Esri Press, hope will help to identify both intended and unintended impacts of land use designs and plans. This presentation will examine the LUCISplus process for analysis alternatives in support of design and plan making across thematic areas and applications.

Iris Patten, GIS Technology University of Arizona Auditorium
4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A Devin Lavigne, Iris Patten, and Tom Fisher Auditorium
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Hosted EXPO Reception   Atrium
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Hosted Dinner   Esri Café
Thursday, January 28, 2016
Time Activity Speaker Location
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast   Atrium
8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. Enabling Technologies Brooks Patrick and Rob Matthews, Esri Auditorium
9:15 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Keynote Speaker: The Case for Integrative Physical Planning – Can GIS-driven Physical Planning, Urban Design and Housing Strategies Enhance the Efficacy in Sustainable Urban Strategies?

If Los Angeles is overtaxed in 2015 with the challenges of carbon based energy, outsourced water and compromised biodiversity, how can the city survive the next 35 years exasperated by an 1.5 million persons increase in population?

With the potential shift in lifestyle changes and emerging smart housing in Los Angeles over the next 35 years, the Now Institute proposes that a high density, interconnected, urban community will significantly leverage and strengthen research in the field of renewable energy and locally sourced water and the promotion of a healthy natural ecology.

The integrative platform of Geodesign allows the team to conjecture that intelligent architecture and well-designed communities offer the strongest and most comprehensive ecosystem that can support the complex inter-related agendas of making Los Angeles sustainable. The isolated pursuits in technology and policy regulations cannot assess its full impact unless a conjoining planning entity such as Geodesign offers an opportunity for implementing strategies for buildings, public space, infrastructural systems, and social issues.

Understanding how people live in Los Angeles is critical to addressing the multiplicity of issues facing the County, as buildings, and in particular, the residential sector, accounts for 36% of all energy used and a striking 68% of all water used. Home to over a 100 unique languages, LA is a diverse and powerful cluster of communities, each dedicated and committed to making their neighborhood clean, healthy, and enjoyable. For each affluent and connected individual, there are many more without a voice, and our geospatial hybridized approach will make room for advocacy on behalf of all Angelenos, and help direct resources and bring about change to the most struggling communities while preserving the character of the quintessential LA lifestyle that lives in harmony with nature.

Migration toward a dense intelligent and sustainable community:
Consistent with trends around the world, more and more people are moving into dense urban environments, craving the social connection and camaraderie afforded through the proximity of various activities and functions, while demanding higher and healthier standards of living. The built environment is at the center of this discussion, as the way people live and move through the city are fundamentally spatial propositions, as are the infrastructural systems of energy, water, transportation, and waste distribution that form the backbone of the daily habits of millions of Angelenos. Through our careful analysis of specific housing typologies and their integration with renewable technologies including home-scaled power generation and storage, water reclamation strategies, and daylighting,

Eui-Sung Yi, Morphosis Architects and The Now Institute at UCLA Auditorium
9:45 a.m. – 10:05 a.m.
Featured Speaker: Incorporating GeoDeisgn Tools and Technology into the Comprehensive Planning Workflows

Today more than ever urban planners must focus on creating healthier and more sustainable environments, neighborhoods, workplaces, and schools. At PlaceWorks we are constantly striving to develop tools to allow us to measure and evaluate the built environment and to tell the story. Geodesign and Esri’s Geoplanner application has enabled us to approach our work in new and exciting ways. The simplicity of the interface along with its powerful set of analytical tools provides us with the ability to create and test land use alternatives and get immediate feedback in regards to a plans performance against a predefined set of indicators.

This session will highlight case studies that illustrate how tools such as GeoPlanner has enabled PlaceWorks to leverage Geodesign principles and create new interactive tools and visualizations that enable us to tell the story of how the qualitative and quantitative assessment of natural and social can influence the outcomes of our designs and plans.

Robert Kain and David Early, PlaceWorks Auditorium
10:05 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A Eui-Sung Yi, Robert Kain, David Early, and Tom Fisher Auditorium
10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Networking Break & EXPO   Atrium
11:00 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.
Featured Speaker: Conservation by Geodesign: Lessons from Gombe

Fifty five years ago Dr. Jane Goodall stepped onto the shores of Lake Tanganyika and through her groundbreaking discoveries about chimpanzees in what is now Gombe National Park in Tanzania, opened a new window to the natural world and to ourselves. Today our closest living relatives have disappeared from four countries, and are close to extinction in many other nations in Africa. The three major threats are illegal commercial bushmeat hunting, disease and habitat loss. Since 1994 the Jane Goodall Institute has been working with individual farmers, local communities, governments along with science and technology partners to collaboratively design more productive and sustainable landscapes. In 2005 the institute started to apply Geodesign along with Conservation Action Planning as the framework and geospatial infrastructure to bring people, disciplines, indigenous and scientific knowledge, data and technologies together and to develop more strategic actions informed by the physical, biologic, social, political and economic fabric of the landscapes. Ten years later natural regeneration of miombo woodlands can be seen in some village forest reserves using 2005 and 2014 DigitalGlobe satellite imagery. In 2014 local communities also reported the largest number of nests sightings north of Gombe National Park. In this presentation we discuss these landscape changes and assess our conservation success using Landsat, DigitalGlobe, and UAV imagery along with community data collected by the village forest monitors. The ongoing long-term research makes Gombe a site of universal value and importance, a living laboratory, where we can learn about chimpanzees while understanding our own place in nature and design landscapes that could better work for people and chimpanzees.

Lilian Pintea, Jane Goodall Institute Auditorium
11:25 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Featured Speaker: Conservation Planning in Global Biodiversity Hotspot using Geodesign Framework

Today wildlife is not confined exclusively to protected areas and sizable numbers exist outside reserves which, among other issues, has resulted in increased wildlife-human conflict. The future of conservation will depend on how best we plan areas where humans and wildlife could co-exist, such as landscapes adjoining protected areas, biodiversity migration corridors, degraded habitats. This study looks at Kodagu district in south India, is part of global biodiversity hotspot of Western Ghats and is also a major coffee growing area surrounded by network of reserved forests and protected areas, with major coffee growing area in the center. This area is frequented by elephants that come out of the forests and raid crops and in extreme cases results in human and elephant deaths. In India annually about 400 humans, and 200 elephants die as a result of elephant-human conflict (EHC).

Geodesign framework was used to bring stakeholders in a participatory planning process that was able to bring the community and forest department together.

Preshant Hedao, University of California at Davis Auditorium
11:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A Lilian Pintea, Preshant Hedao, Tom Fisher Auditorium
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Hosted Lunch   Esri Café
1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Lightning Talks

  Auditorium
3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Networking Break   Atrium
3:30 p.m. – 3:40 p.m.
Featured Speaker: Pedagogical Approaches to Geodesign: Teaching Geodesign to Non-designers

The presentation offers tips and suggests processes and methods to teach geo-design methods and techniques to non-designers, and in schools that are not design focused. The presenter focuses on a Geodesign Studio course that he has taught in the Environmental Studies Program (EVST) at the University of Redlands, as a case study. This course is not only the first Geodesign course at the University of Redlands, but also the first design-related course in the EVST.

This project was focused on designing a Transit Oriented Development (TOD) village in the southern part of the University of Redlands campus. The students worked in groups and with an actual client to respond to the project requirements. They also learned from the ESRI staff about the use of Geoplanner in scenario making.

In this presentation, the presenter starts with explaining the course and the teaching environment, he then explains the opportunities and challenges of teaching Geodesign to non-designers, and at the end provides practical suggestions and tips for responding to these challenges and turning them into opportunities for effective instruction of Geodesign.

Nader Afzalan, University of Redlands Auditorium
3:40 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Featured Speaker: Establishing a B.S. in Geodesign to Foster Interdisciplinary Collaboration

The past six Geodesign summits hosted by Esri have brought together scholars and practitioners with a variety of interests and backgrounds that share a passion for finding new ways of improving the world around us. Inspired by their stories and journeys, two years ago we created an interdisciplinary bachelor’s of science degree in Geodesign to engage and train students in: (1) the collection and transformation of geospatial data into knowledge and wisdom; (2) the role of planning as a framework to help guide collective and individual action; and (3) design as a vehicle for identifying and building support for plans and actions that would promote environmental sustainability and human well-being across multiple spatial and temporal scales. The B.S. in Geodesign that we launched at the University of Southern California four semesters ago is rapidly attracting majors and has attracted broad support from the three deans of the participating schools (the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, the Price School of Public Policy and the USC School of Architecture) as well as the USC Provost’s Office. We have launched a series of new studios as well as traditional classes, modified several existing classes to serve this new population of students, and one colleague is currently teaching the first Geodesign capstone for a real-world client in a new collaborative classroom build expressly for the Geodesign program. This talk will describe our goals and aspirations in launching this novel undergraduate degree program, making note of what we have accomplished thus far and our plans for the future, and more especially, how our experiences might guide others with similar goals and aspirations. John Wilson, USC

John Wilson, USC Auditorium
3:50 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Featured Speaker: Geodesign Education: Reflections on a Collaborative Geodesign Summer Course

This presentation aims to share and reflect on an intensive collaboration to develop and deliver a Geodesign study abroad course in summer 2015. Geodesign is a forward-thinking, interdisciplinary framework that pairs planning, design, and environmental systems with spatial decision support tools to explore ways to build a better world. While the practice of Geodesign is centuries old, as witnessed in European approaches to land management, transportation systems, and residential and commercial development, the existence of Geodesign as a curricular pathway is just developing. For instance, the very first undergraduate degree program in Geodesign was launched fall 2013 at the University of Southern California. The motivation to develop this course was to provide a living-learning experience that introduced students to the critical and spatial thinking skills of Geodesign while engaged in both classroom and field settings in Los Angeles, California, and in the Netherlands, and to apply the knowledge gained in a capstone research project that proposes a Geodesign strategy to address a societal challenge in Los Angeles County. The five-week intensive course was a collaboration between faculty from the University of Southern California, Vrije University Amsterdam, Harvard University, and the University of Dammam, and included a two-week field experience in the Netherlands to provide students with vital insight into the challenges, solutions, and motives underlying the practice of Geodesign. Learning objectives were accomplished through a combination of readings, discussions, presentations, guest lectures, field excursions, hands-on activities, in addition to an applied case study to develop a mixed-use green zone in the Amstelland region of the Netherlands.

Darren Ruddell, USC Auditorium
4:00 p.m. – 4:10 p.m.
Featured Speaker: Facilitating Asynchronous Student Team Collaboration in Geodesign Education

For the student, online courses are typically an asynchronous, individual endeavor, aside from faculty instruction. However the Geodesign process is intrinsically collaborative, thereby, the challenge of teaching a Geodesign module online is how to effectively facilitate an asynchronous team collaboration. This talk will discuss the strategies for delivering an 8-week, online, Geodesign course that focused on decision and evaluation modeling. Specific computer-mediated communication tools were utilized to facilitate dialog and foster team collaboration as students participated in developing a methods plan for a case Geodesign project. The case project for this course was the Ocoee River Gorge section of the Tennessee Department of Transportation Corridor K project. Stretching 24 miles, much of it through the ecologically and culturally sensitive Cherokee National Forest, the project aimed to provide a safe, reliable, and efficient transportation route while enhancing sustainable economic growth in the region. Rich with complexity, the project challenged student teams. Through weekly assignments, students scoped the study from preliminary TNDOT transportation reports, assessed the “People of the Place” though role-playing members of the Citizen’s Resource Team, and developed a method plan by correlating the relationship of core community values to measurable spatial and non-spatial indicators of the study.

David Goldberg, Penn State Auditorium
4:10 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A Nader Afzalan, John Wilson, Darren Ruddell, David Goldberg, and Tom Fisher Auditorium
4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Closing Session Tom Fisher and Jack Dangermond Auditorium

Contact Us | Privacy | Legal